Location:
 Home » Liberia » Liberia: Political Transition and U.S. Relations

Liberia: Political Transition and U.S. Relations

Liberia: Political Transition and U.S. Relations
  • Buy New: $9.95
  • as of 11/21/2018 20:15 UTC details
In Stock
Buy
New (3) Used (1) from $9.95
  • Seller:Amazon.com
  • Sales Rank:8,656,287
  • Languages:English (Published), English (Original Language), English (Unknown)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Edition:CRS Report R45195
  • Pages:26
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.26
  • Dimensions (in):8.5 x 0.1 x 11
  • Publication Date:June 2, 2018
  • ISBN:1720655030
  • EAN:9781720655039
  • ASIN:1720655030
Shipping:Eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping
Availability:Usually ships in 24 hours

Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Liberia, a small coastal West African country on the Gulf of Guinea, has made substantial development gains since the end of the second of two civil wars (1989-1997 and 1999-2003). In late 2017, Liberia held its third post-war general election. George Weah, a former soccer star, won the presidential election in a runoff and was inaugurated on January 22, 2018. Weah succeeded two-term president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who was constitutionally prohibited from seeking a third term, in Liberia’s first electoral transfer of state executive power since 1944. Weah’s policy agenda focuses on four broad goals: improved service delivery and support for marginalized groups; economic growth and diversification; the further consolidation of peace and security; and improved governance, transparency, and accountability. Weah inherits significant challenges from the Sirleaf administration, including the continuing aftereffects of a devastating 2014-2016 outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease, which undermined the country's weak health system and economy. He will govern without support from a U.N. peacekeeping operation, known as UNMIL, which provided significant post-war security and governance support for 15 years until its mandate ended in late March 2018.The Weah government is likely to remain a recipient of substantial bilateral and multilateral aid, although the extent and focus of this aid is likely to be conditioned, in part, on his leadership and governance records. The United States has maintained close bilateral ties with Liberia for nearly 200 years, with periodic exceptions. Ties were particularly close during the Sirleaf years. The U.S. State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) have administered a wide range of post-war bilateral assistance programs, especially in the areas of health and economic development. Liberia also benefits from programs administered by other U.S. agencies, including the Department of the Treasury, Peace Corps, Defense Department, and the Millennium Challenge Corporation. Congress has maintained an interest in Liberia, and has held hearings on its post-war development, stability, and democratization trajectories. Congress has appropriated more than $5 billion in post-war aid and assistance to halt the Ebola outbreak, and helped to foster relations through a House Democracy Partnership with the Liberian legislature. Some Members of Congress, often those with politically active Liberian-American constituencies, have also supported the immigration rights of noncitizen Liberians resident in the United States.

In Stock
Buy
CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED ‘AS IS’ AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.

About Kilima.com | Ordering & Shipping | Kilima.com Archive | Contact Kilima.com

Kilima.com in association with Amazon.com. Powered by Associate-O-Matic. Flags courtesy of 3dflags.com & 3dflagsplus.com.

Copyright © 1996 - Kilima.com